Texas Lottery Numbers All Or Nothing






texas lottery numbers all or nothing



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This entry was posted by admin on Thursday, April 12th, 2012 at 1:04 pm and is filed under Winning Lotto Number . You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

35 Comments

  1. koko says:

    Is this Scam or REAL?
    OKay i had an ad on Craigslist stating i am looking for a babysitting job. I waited a few weeks and finally a woman replied stating that she is moving from Russia to my area in texas. Any way we’ve spoken muiltiple times and she told me about her daughter and i told her about my son. Newho she keeps telling me she will send me a check for the four weeks ahead of time that her boss is going to pay & after that she will pay for my babysitting services. I told her that i will be very cheap and only charge her $80 a week which will be $320 a month. This morning she said she will be mailing the check which will be $3500 via UPS. she gave me muiltiple directions to deposit the check and withdrawl $800 for my self when i should be recieveing $320. and then to send the rest which is $2700 to someone in NC. but gave me an address for a man Pennsylvania. Im confused. Anyway then she said I needed to then write down the western union info for her and she will tell denise. But who the hell is denise at first she told me the GUYs name is Richard Kilnect

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no job.

      There is no person in Russia, no child, no one moving to Texas.

      There is only a scammer trying to steal your hard-earned money.

      The check is fake, sent on a stolen UPS/FedEx billing account number and will bounce. The only real life job here is you paying back the bank for all their money you sent to the scammer via Western Union or moneygram. All the names mentioned are just some of the fake names that scammer uses to steal money from people.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      6 “Rules to follow” to avoid most fake jobs:
      1) Job asks you to use your personal bank account and/or open a new one.
      2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order.
      3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity.
      4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone.
      5) Job asks you to pay visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram.
      6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting or identity verification site.

      Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed ‘red flags’ and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason.

  2. me says:

    Mystery Shopper Scam?
    Hi. So today in the mail i got a letter and check to be a “mystery shopper”. The check is for 1,989.43 dollars and it has my name on it with my address. I live in the US and the check is from Houston, Texas. The bank it is from is Amegy Bank which is actually a real bank when i searched it up. The company that does this “secret shopper” is called S.B. Ideas International. Moving on to the actual letter, it says i have to go to their website set up my account and validate the check (which i already did). Then to go deposit the check and keep $350 and use the rest to be a “secret shopper”. After i go to a store and do that i have to fill out a evaluation and email the email address they provided with my receipt for the stuff i bought. And thats it. The director on the letter is Larry Jeffery. Is this a scam? I supposedly did a survey for this. I think i did. Not sure. Should u ask my bank if it is a scam?

  3. Cyd says:

    Does this sound like a scam?
    I’m looking to rent a house and I saw some great ads on Craigslist. I contacted the seller and here’s what she said:

    Dear,

    Thanks for your email and interest in my house. I am Clara Villa the owner of the House you are interested in. My House is located at ********** **. Presently am in Texas with my family, we came to stay with my mother-in-law who is suffering from breast cancer On getting here we discovered that we will be staying here for at least 5 years. so we decided to look for a responsible and caring person to maintain and take proper care of my House.We are honest and sincere family and have spent a lot on our properties so I will want you to treat it as your own. you will pay $700/month, The money involved does not matters to me but I want you to keep it tidy all the time so that I will be glad to see it neat when I come for a check up.The house is located at ***** ***** ****** **********, *********** ** 12345(It didn’t say that, but keeping this confidential.)

    Initially I and my Husband wanted to sell the house on getting to ******** on a second thought we decided to rent it out since we will be returning back to the house in the next 7 years I will like you to go take a look at the exterior part of the house because you will not be able to go inside to see the interior hence I have all the keys here with me. You can get back to me if you are truly interested.

    My house is a 4bed rooms,2bath. Very well furnished, the living room also has a fire place, and a mounted plasma screen television. The bedrooms are well furnished with a cheery wood night stand and a chest with a dressing table, a foot board and a head board. the mattress on it is a sorta pillow top mattress, this is the same in all rooms except the master bedroom which had a walking closet and mini Jacuzzi tub,2 vanity double sink,and a sleep number bed. This room also has a 37 inch plasma television. The kitchen has a stainless steel electric cooker and a self cleaning oven, a built in microwave and a double door whirlpool refrigerator. The house also has a central cooling and heating systems, with ceiling fans in all rooms. Plates, cutlery, and sheets are all provided. Extra blanket and sheets are in the extra closet located by the bathroom. The cable,light and internet bills are all included in the rent. Do get back to me if you are truly interested and sure of taking proper care of my house there is a rent application form which I will like you to fill and Send back to me. If you can do all this for me, then I will be willing to rent my house to you.

    Looking forward to hear from you. Your full information will be used to process all documents that will be coming together with the keys leading to the house and this will come to you through UPS courier service.

    Thank you and remain Blessed.

    Mrs.Clara Villa

    It’s just since she mentioned we can’t meet face to face, I’m thinking this smells a little fishy and she’s attempting to scam me. Does this sound like a scam?
    Whoops! Wrong category, sorry everybody.

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no apartment or house for rent.

      There is only a scammer trying to steal your hard-earned money with stolen pictures of someone else’s dwelling and a fake story of being out of town/state/country doing charitable works.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses and will demand you pay for rent and deposit, in cash, and only by Western Union or moneygram.

      The scammer might suggest you “send” money to a friend or to yourself and then send a scan of the receipt to the scammer as proof you have the funds. The scammer will simply that take scanned receipt or just the MTCN# (money transfer control number) into Western Union or moneygram store and pick up the cash you thought you were sending to a friend or yourself.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great places to rent, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      If you google “fake apartment rental”, “fraud Western Union house rent scam”, “fake craigslist apartment rent scam” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

  4. Lyn says:

    Is this a Craigslist scam?
    This person has given me his name and company. Chris Burnap, lives in Texas and works for Nielsen Company. He hasn’t mentioned moneygram, Western Union, or transferring him money at all. He told me the things I need to buy and from where (brown envelopes, paper checks). Here is the description:
    ” (1/2)It is about Mailing and dispaching checks billed to clients
    You duties,..You are Make and Print checks with our banking Informations and Mail them out using courier service.”

    He also had me make a yahoo account. The only reason I suspect this may be fake, is because I’ve received a few emails asking me to do the same thing.

  5. Carolyn says:

    Send money for ts2 phones to talk to soldiers ?
    Meet a man on dateline “soldier ” he wants to hear my voice only way is to send money. Looked up company for ts2 no contact numbers. Im to send the money to a lady in Paris Texas.??? Am I being scammed. Help where do I find out if he is real or not???

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no soldier, no one in the military, no one needing a special cell phone and nothing legit in those emails.

      There is only a scammer trying to steal your hard-earned money.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses and will demand you pay for made-up fees, in cash, and only by Western Union or moneygram.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      6 “Rules to follow” to avoid most fake jobs:
      1) Job asks you to use your personal bank/paypal account and/or open a new one.
      2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order.
      3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity.
      4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone.
      5) Job asks you to pay visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram.
      6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting or identity verification site.

      Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed ‘red flags’ and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason.

      If you google “fake Afghanistan scam Western Union”, “fraud Western Union military love scam”, “fake military leave dating scam”, “fake ts2 military phone scam” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

  6. officer party poopa says:

    what is the best scratch lottery ticket to pick in canada?
    mofos i need an answer. im sure itd be helpful to all yalls includin me

    • John W says:

      The Canadian lottery commissions are not very good about publishing details of their scratch off games. They don’t publish how many tickets were or how many prizes were printed in each prize category. They do publish how many of the “top” prizes are unclaimed once a week and the odds of winning any prize. This makes it very difficult to compare any two Canadian Scratchoff game.

      Currently, they have one scratchoff game that spans all the various lottery commissions where the Ontario Lottery commission published how many tickets and prizes were originally printed while the other commissions only published the usual top unclaimed prizes info. They also printed on the ticket how many tickets were printed and how many prizes were in the very top prize categories. This is the only scratchoff game in Canada where there is enough information to estimate the return and odds on a week to week basis. Unfortunately the prizes claimed that Ontario publishes often contradicts that of the other lottery commissions. It’s called “$100 Million Fortune$”. Unfortunately, since you can’t calculate the odds on any other game, there’s nothing to compare it to.

      I buy the $100 Million Fortune only because I won $50 prizes three times in a row with it and it’s a $10 game funded with $100 million in prizes so that’s comparable to the Extreme Payout game in Texas which is a $50 game funded with $140 million. However the estimated return on $100 Million Fortune varies between 69 cents to 72 cents on the dollar. Just an average return by American scratchoff game standards but keep in mind that it’s tax free in Canada.

      The Western Canada Lottery Commission had a $20 game called “Super Set For Life” that had a 2 million dollar top prize. It seems to be at the end of it’s retail life but one top prize is still unclaimed and it looks like there were only two top prizes anyways. They don’t feature it prominently on their website except in the unclaimed prizes page. That game, if you can find it would have a good chance of good odds for the top prize so long as it’s not sitting in a safety deposit box awaiting a divorce finalization somewheres. The suspicious thing is that the first “Super Set For Life” winner was literally in the same town as the lottery commissions office.

      You should email the Canadian lottery commissions asking them to publish all the scratchoff information on a daily basis the way that the Texas lottery commission does.

      Meanwhile, although there are games like “Vegas Night” with better odds to win any prize, the only games I would recommend would be the “$100 Million Fortune$” and the “Super Set For Life” which is near the end of it’s retail life. The Lucky Lines game looks promising but it looks like it’s a perennial game where new games come out with the same name to replace it and that there are three games with that name actively being sold and only one still has top prizes available (they really should remove one from the market before releasing another one with the same name), overlapping perennial games also happen in Texas but are easier to spot cause the old games will be labeled “Closing Soon” at the vending machine.

      Unlike the American games where the tickets are still on a roll and they sell them serially off the roll and every ticket is clearly numbered as to their position in the roll, the Canadian games have their tickets separated and in a counter display case with very little indication as to what order they were in in the pack. That means that it’s impossible to know if the game had been cherry picked by the retailer should the retailer have access to something that could identify the winners such as an x-ray machine or an extremely intense light source.

      Canada certainly doesn’t have a game comparable to the Texas $500,000,000 Blockbuster game.

  7. Carolyn says:

    Am i being scammed from a soldier or a terr?
    Meet a soldier online wants me to money gram to a woman in Paris Texas. So we can talk want me to sell everything an relocate

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no soldier, no one in the military, no one needing a special cell phone and nothing legit in those emails.

      There is only a scammer trying to steal your hard-earned money.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses and will demand you pay for made-up fees, in cash, and only by Western Union or moneygram.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      6 “Rules to follow” to avoid most fake jobs:
      1) Job asks you to use your personal bank/paypal account and/or open a new one.
      2) Job asks you to print/mail/cash a check or money order.
      3) Job asks you to use Western Union or moneygram in any capacity.
      4) Job asks you to accept packages and re-ship them on to anyone.
      5) Job asks you to pay visas, travel fees via Western Union or moneygram.
      6) Job asks you to sign up for a credit reporting or identity verification site.

      Avoiding all jobs that mention any of the above listed ‘red flags’ and you will miss nearly all fake jobs. Only scammers ask you to do any of the above. No. Exceptions. Ever. For any reason.

      If you google “fake Afghanistan scam Western Union”, “fraud Western Union military love scam”, “fake military leave dating scam”, “fake ts2 military phone scam” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

  8. mark j says:

    pls someone give me six # to play the lottery today is my birthday?

    • the "nemisis" of yahoo says:

      First of all, HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

      Now, to answer your question:

      Since today is your Birthday and today is your lucky day, why not use your birthday numbers as the first three numbers out of six, and the balance use your girlfriends birthday numbers.

      I have bet on the Texas Lottery several times, won a few hundred dollars, nothing to get all excited about, but it was a nice return on a $1.00 bet, but no longer bet since I have heard that the lottery is rigged, and that would be like expecting to win and win big playing the gaming tables in Vegas, especially when the odds are stacked in favor of the house. Now, I still take bets, only in this case the odds are more in my favor, the way I like it, and this new game is called the Stock market and believe me you can make more money in one month, after all taxes, than many people can earn in a year, before taxes.

      I do want to wish you luck with the lottery and if you do win using this advise, then take a couple hundred dollars of your winnings and buy bags of cat and dog food (dry) and donate them to the No-Kill Animal Shelter to help them feed the many animals under their care.

      Thank you

  9. kevin naderi says:

    help me with texas two step?
    the past numbers were 5 23 29 30- bonus ball-6 i am tryimg to win if any have a lottery shaker please give me the best results ps i am frusteraed. thanks any advice and if you have a lottery shaker please use it and tell me what it syss thanks.

    • pdq says:

      “thanks any advice” OK, here goes…

      The lottery is the WORST bet on the planet. This particular one only gives you a 1 out of 1,832,600 chance to win the jackpot, (see link below), and the jackpot is only $225,000 right now! That’s horrible!

      Here is the math on your lifetime chances to win this lottery jackpot: If you spent $50 per week on this drawing each and every week for the next 70 years, you’d have approximately a 10% chance of hitting the jackpot just once in your entire lifetime!

      A 10% chance to hit a lottery jackpot actually doesn’t seem all that bad! But remember that’s after an entire lifetime of excessive spending on this one game! Plus, you’d need an average of TEN lifetimes just to win this only once!

      Here is more bad news, but it’s very important to believe this, otherwise someone is going to scam you one of these days: ANYBODY who tells you they can use a “lottery shaker” or any other such crap to increase your chances of winning a lottery, is either LYING to you so they can fool you into buying that crap, OR they are a complete idiot, or both.

      The lottery is nothing more than a TAX on the poor and on the ignorant. No other standard form of betting comes even close to being as bad. If you must play, just buy ONE quick pick ticket once in a while. For the cost of a buck, perhaps it’s worth it to give you that dream of “hitting it big”. Any more spent than that is a total waste of money.

  10. Cyd says:

    Does this sound sketchy?
    I’m looking to rent a house and I saw some great ads on Craigslist. I contacted the seller and here’s what she said:

    Dear,

    Thanks for your email and interest in my house. I am Clara Villa the owner of the House you are interested in. My House is located at ********** **. Presently am in Texas with my family, we came to stay with my mother-in-law who is suffering from breast cancer On getting here we discovered that we will be staying here for at least 5 years. so we decided to look for a responsible and caring person to maintain and take proper care of my House.We are honest and sincere family and have spent a lot on our properties so I will want you to treat it as your own. you will pay $700/month, The money involved does not matters to me but I want you to keep it tidy all the time so that I will be glad to see it neat when I come for a check up.The house is located at ***** ***** ****** **********, *********** ** 12345(It didn’t say that, but keeping this confidential.)

    Initially I and my Husband wanted to sell the house on getting to ******** on a second thought we decided to rent it out since we will be returning back to the house in the next 7 years I will like you to go take a look at the exterior part of the house because you will not be able to go inside to see the interior hence I have all the keys here with me. You can get back to me if you are truly interested.

    My house is a 4bed rooms,2bath. Very well furnished, the living room also has a fire place, and a mounted plasma screen television. The bedrooms are well furnished with a cheery wood night stand and a chest with a dressing table, a foot board and a head board. the mattress on it is a sorta pillow top mattress, this is the same in all rooms except the master bedroom which had a walking closet and mini Jacuzzi tub,2 vanity double sink,and a sleep number bed. This room also has a 37 inch plasma television. The kitchen has a stainless steel electric cooker and a self cleaning oven, a built in microwave and a double door whirlpool refrigerator. The house also has a central cooling and heating systems, with ceiling fans in all rooms. Plates, cutlery, and sheets are all provided. Extra blanket and sheets are in the extra closet located by the bathroom. The cable,light and internet bills are all included in the rent. Do get back to me if you are truly interested and sure of taking proper care of my house there is a rent application form which I will like you to fill and Send back to me. If you can do all this for me, then I will be willing to rent my house to you.

    Looking forward to hear from you. Your full information will be used to process all documents that will be coming together with the keys leading to the house and this will come to you through UPS courier service.

    Thank you and remain Blessed.

    Mrs.Clara Villa

    It’s just since she mentioned we can’t meet face to face, I’m thinking this smells a little fishy and she’s attempting to scam me. Does this sound like a scam?

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no apartment or house for rent.

      There is only a scammer trying to steal your hard-earned money with stolen pictures of someone else’s dwelling and a fake story of being out of town/state/country doing charitable works.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses and will demand you pay for rent and deposit, in cash, and only by Western Union or moneygram.

      The scammer might suggest you “send” money to a friend or to yourself and then send a scan of the receipt to the scammer as proof you have the funds. The scammer will simply that take scanned receipt or just the MTCN# (money transfer control number) into Western Union or moneygram store and pick up the cash you thought you were sending to a friend or yourself.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great places to rent, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      If you google “fake apartment rental”, “fraud Western Union house rent scam”, “fake craigslist apartment rent scam” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

  11. Jared T says:

    A question about time zones.?
    I live in New Mexico,Texas is just a few minutes away from here and they are an hour ahead of us,If I do something bad can I cross over the Texas border and it will be like nothing ever happened, isnt that going back into the past,and if Im in Texas will I already know what happens in the future(1 hour from now?

    • Tom K says:

      And why won’t anyone in Australia or New Zealand, who are usually in tomorrow relative to me, tell me today’s winning lottery numbers?

  12. M A Ranatha says:

    Sorry friend but there is no Microsoft, Yahoo or other e-mail lottery, it’s a scam do not answer do not give personal information.
    the iinternet is safe enough if you are careful but please answer nothing that you are doubtful about.Good Luck and be careful

  13. ShaRonda says:

    do i win if i get 2 numbers correct on pick 3 lottery in tx?
    Texas lottery pick 3, i got 2 out of 3 numbers right. do i win money?

  14. Aaron says:

    Scam?………………..?
    Somebody is trying to sell me a bull terrier puppy for $200 and she is shipping him from Colorado to me.(i live in Texas). Any help?

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no dog for sale.

      There are stolen pictures of someone else’s dog.

      There is only a scammer trying to steal your hard-earned money.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses pretending to be the “pet shipping company” and will demand you pay for shipping fees, in cash, and only by Western Union or moneygram.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      If you google “Cameroon pet scam”, “fake puppy sale scam Western Union” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam. There are sites where you can look up pictures and find the site or sites where the scammer stolen the cute pictures of the puppies.

  15. Jessica says:

    Selling cell phone on craigslist being sold buyer wants to send money through western union?
    Ok so I live in new York and I posted a cell phone I had laying around on craigslist and some guy from texas asked me to ship it to west Africa for his wife he will send money Through western union I told him I will ship to him but not his wife he said that was fine should I Accept money by western union and ship package to him? By the way he is paying for the shipping too

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no buyer, no one in Texas and nothing legit in that email from a scammer.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses pretending to be from “Western Union” and will demand you pay some acceptance fee, in cash, via Western Union or moneygram. Or the fake Western Union email will demand you provide the tracking number before the “money is released”. Western Union NEVER demands a tracking number to complete a money transaction.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of being the perfect buyer, great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      If you google “Western Union buyer scam”, “moneygram payment phone scam”, “fake Western Union email payment fraud” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near victims of this type of scam.

  16. Buffy Staffordshire says:

    100% scam.

    There is no condo/house/apartment for rent. While the house does exist and is for sale, you are NOT emailing the owner, you are emailing a scammer.

    That scammer is trying to steal your hard-earned money with stolen pictures of someone else’s dwelling and a fake story of being out of town/state/country doing charitable works.

    The next email will be from one of the scammer’s fake names and free email address and will demand you pay for first month’s rent and deposit, in cash, and only via Western Union or moneygram then he will “ship” the keys to you.

    The scammer might suggest you “send” money to a friend or to yourself and then send a scan of the receipt to the scammer as proof you have the funds. The scammer will simply that take scanned receipt or just the MTCN# (money transfer control number) into Western Union or moneygram store and pick up the cash you thought you were sending to a friend or yourself.

    Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great places to rent, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

    You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    If you google “fake apartment rental”, “fraud Western Union house rent scam”, “fake craigslist apartment rent scam” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

  17. Buffy Staffordshire says:

    100% scam.

    There is no buyer.

    Notice how the scammer doesn’t call what you are selling by name? He uses the generic word “item”, that is because he sends the same stock copy/paste email to anyone selling everything that he can find and he has no idea what you are selling and doesn’t care.

    The scammer isn’t interested in your identity or bank account only in convincing you to ship your possession to him without him sending you a penny.

    The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses pretending to be “paypal” saying “kindly send YOUR cash to pay the shipper”.

    Paypal does NOT send such emails, ever. Paypal does NOT have escrow or money holding services like that scammer describes. Paypal does NOT demand you send a tracking number or send CASH via Western Union or moneygram before money is sent. EVER. No exceptions.

    Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of being the perfect buyer, great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    If you google “cragislist buyer scam”, “fake paypal email scam”, “ebay escrow fraud” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near victims of this type of scam.

    Check out the one and only official paypal website, read up on what paypal does and how it really works.

  18. Buffy Staffordshire says:

    100% scam.

    There is no condo/house/apartment for rent. While the house does exist and is for sale, you are NOT emailing the owner, you are emailing a scammer.

    That scammer is trying to steal your hard-earned money with stolen pictures of someone else’s dwelling and a fake story of being out of town/state/country doing charitable works.

    The next email will be from one of the scammer’s fake names and free email address and will demand you pay for first month’s rent and deposit, in cash, and only via Western Union or moneygram then he will “ship” the keys to you.

    The scammer might suggest you “send” money to a friend or to yourself and then send a scan of the receipt to the scammer as proof you have the funds. The scammer will simply that take scanned receipt or just the MTCN# (money transfer control number) into Western Union or moneygram store and pick up the cash you thought you were sending to a friend or yourself.

    Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

    Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of great places to rent, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

    You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

    Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

    Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

    If you google “fake apartment rental”, “fraud Western Union house rent scam”, “fake craigslist apartment rent scam” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near-victims of this type of scam.

  19. shirley p says:

    How do i have a bank investigated ?
    I met a guy on the internet who wanted 2 do busnis with me in south africa.he said he using the american bank of texas afta many emails with the bank im asked 2 pay cost of transfer to release the money is it legal or is it a scam and wher can i report it if is

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no investor wanting to give you millions to buy property, get a business going or donate to charity. There is no such bank as American Bank of Texas.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses pretending to be the “government bank agent” or “banker/financier” and will demand you pay for fake cost of transfer fees, certificates, documents, stamps, duties, court/bank costs, all in cash, via Western Union or moneygram.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of being the perfect buyer, great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      If you google “Western Union investment scam”, “moneygram payment scam”, “fake investor fraud” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near victims of this type of scam.

  20. Elisa Tapanes says:

    Whether or not an Ebay sale is a spam?
    I’m selling my old iPhone 3 on Ebay and I got a buy it now with in a few hours. It says its a lady in Texas and I live in Cali. She sent me an email saying that she wants me to send it to Africa for her grandson who is in Africa for school. Shes offering $40 more to pay for shipping which I don’t think would be enough. She wants an invoice on what she owes me and wants to pay me through Paypal not from the Ebay sale. I saw some other people asking about the same question and people replied that it’s probably a spam. Don’t know what to think?!

    • Buffy Staffordshire says:

      100% scam.

      There is no buyer, no one in Texas, no grandson and no payment coming, The only “truths” in that email is the scammer is located in Africa and wants your iphone, without paying, of course.

      The next email will be from another of the scammer’s fake names and free email addresses pretending to be “Paypal” saying “kindly send some fee via Western Union or moneygram and we will release the funds”.

      Or the next email will claim “too much money was sent” and you must send your cash to pay the “car shipper” before the paypal transaction completes.

      Paypal does NOT send such emails, ever. Paypal does NOT demand the receiver pay a fee. EVER. No exceptions.

      Western Union and moneygram do not verify anything on the form the sender fills out, not the name, not the street address, not the country, not even the gender of the receiver, it all means absolutely nothing. The clerk will not bother to check ID and will simply hand off your cash to whomever walks in the door with the MTCN# and question/answer. Neither company will tell the sender who picked up the cash, at what store location or even in what country your money walked out the door. Neither company has any kind of refund policy, money sent is money gone forever.

      Now that you have responded to a scammer, you are on his ‘potential sucker’ list, he will try again to separate you from your cash. He will send you more emails from his other free email addresses using another of his fake names with all kinds of stories of being the perfect buyer, great jobs, lottery winnings, millions in the bank and desperate, lonely, sexy singles. He will sell your email address to all his scamming buddies who will also send you dozens of fake emails all with the exact same goal, you sending them your cash via Western Union or moneygram.

      You could post up the email address and the emails themselves that the scammer is using, it will help make your post more googlable for other suspicious potential victims to find when looking for information.

      Do you know how to check the header of a received email? If not, you could google for information. Being able to read the header to determine the geographic location an email originated from will help you weed out the most obvious scams and scammers. Then delete and block that scammer. Don’t bother to tell him that you know he is a scammer, it isn’t worth your effort. He has one job in life, convincing victims to send him their hard-earned cash.

      Whenever suspicious or just plain curious, google everything, website addresses, names used, companies mentioned, phone numbers given, all email addresses, even sentences from the emails as you might be unpleasantly surprised at what you find already posted online. You can also post/ask here and every scam-warner-anti-fraud-busting site you can find before taking a chance and losing money to a scammer.

      If you google “cragislist buyer scam”, “fake paypal email scam”, “ebay escrow fraud” or something similar you will find hundreds of posts from victims and near victims of this type of scam.

      Check out the one and only official paypal website, read up on what paypal does and how it really works.

  21. Amanda says:

    Craigslist pet adoption scam?
    We put our cat on CL for free to a loving family. I got a response from a woman who wanted her for her daughter on her birthday. Some of the details just dont add up to me and im asking for any advise that any one can give me. The details are as follows:

    She lives in Kansas and has given me her physical address(i live in texas), she tells me that she is deaf and can only communicate through emails and text messaging. She has arranged for a pet shipping company to come pick up our cat after we recieved payment for her(that her trustee has mailed to us via Fedex). Initially we werent asking any thing for her but she insisted that she pay us.. so she included a payment of $150 plus $1820 for ME to western union to the shipping company. This seemed odd to me at first. But the details get more strange. Her address is in Kansas, her trustee mailed the payment from florida and i was to western union the money to the shipping company manager in colorado. Her phone number is a 201 area code from new jersey. The company was supposed to come pick the cat up today around 4 pm but i got two emails from the woman and from the company saying she still owed them $810. She said she would send another $1000, $810 for the rest of the cost, $90 for the western union fee and an addtional $100 for me extra payment. How ever the reciever of this payment was not the same as last time, this time it is supposed to go to a woman in Virginia. She then texts me this morning and still wants the movers to pick up the cat at the same scheduled time but she wanted me to use my own money to pay them and her check that came tuesday would be compensation. I simply could not do that, i told her there could be no way i could come up with that money and it would have to wait until tuesday, but she wanted the pet back at her home on Sunday(tomorrow). She seemed a little upset but did agree to wait until tuesday when i am supposed to receive the second check..

    This all seems fishy to me. Its strange because she is the one giving us almost a total of $3000 just for a cat for her daughter to give on her birthday…

    Does any one have any comments or advise they can give me? Is this known to go on in the Craigslist community?

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